Hokualakai Gets a Home

Hokualakai Gets a Home

On July 11, 2016 at 9:30am the Department of Transportation is going to hold a ceremony celebrating the official approval for the Hokualakai to be docked at Palekai. Members of PUEO have been working to restore the double hull voyaging canoe, Hokualakai, as a teaching vessel.  We are excited to announce this event and hope you can join us in support down at the park.    ...
Juno orbits Jupiter!

Juno orbits Jupiter!

Normally this space on our site is for information related to discoveries from Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, but the successful orbit (click on this article’s title to see the animation) of Jupiter by Juno effects everyone on the planet.  Jupiter is one of the first planets to form in our system and what is inside this planet that almost became a sun is a mystery.  We are hopeful Juno can  unlock some of the deep secrets of how our planets formed and how a gas planet like Jupiter works.  Follow along on NASA’s page all about the Juno Mission....
30 Hawaiian Akamai interns advance their education this summer

30 Hawaiian Akamai interns advance their education this summer

From West Hawaii Today “So, what are you doing this summer?” is one of the most commonly asked questions students are asked when walking out of their final exams. But instead of replying with a casual shrug of the shoulders, Hawaii residents Nicole Tabac, Kyle Mauri and Daryl Albano had the unique opportunity to proudly say, “I’m a Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Akamai intern.” While these students are akamai by every stretch of the word, they are among 30 college students interning in STEM related organizations throughout the Big Island and Maui as a part of the Akamai Internship Program. The program’s mission is to provide college students the opportunity to gain work experience at an observatory, company or technical facility in Hawaii for seven weeks. It has had tremendous success, with an 81 percent retention rate of students staying on the STEM pathway in college and beyond. The program includes housing, travel fees and a stipend to interns. Such is possible through generous funding from sponsors such as Thirty Meter Telescope International Observatory and The Air Force Office of Scientific Research based in Arlington, VA. Yet, unlike other similar internships, the program has a variety of sites and jobs available for each student based on their aptitudes and interests. The list includes more than 50 different fields of STEM ranging from biology to computer programming. Students are placed with a project and mentor that best suits their interests, according to Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope’s outreach program manager, Mary Beth Laychak. “You want to make sure the intern, mentor and project are all very well aligned,” she said. “And that’s something that Lisa...
Maunakea telescope UKIRT presents rare infrared view of the deep Universe

Maunakea telescope UKIRT presents rare infrared view of the deep Universe

Astronomers at The University of Nottingham have released spectacular new infrared images of the distant Universe, providing the deepest view ever obtained over a large area of sky. The team, led by Omar Almaini, Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Physics and Astronomy, is presenting their results at the National Astronomy Meeting taking place this week at the University’s Jubilee Campus. The final data release from the Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS) maps an area four times the size of the full Moon to unprecedented depth. Over 250,000 galaxies have been detected, including several hundred observed within the first billion years after the Big Bang. Astronomers around the world will use the new images to study the early stages of galaxy formation and evolution. The release of the final UDS images represents the culmination of a project that began taking data in 2005. The scientists used the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) on Hawaii to observe the same patch of sky repeatedly, building up more than 1000 hours of exposure time. Observing in the infrared is vital for studying the distant Universe, as ordinary starlight is “redshifted” to longer wavelengths due to the cosmological expansion of the Universe. Because of the finite speed of light, the most distant galaxies are also observed very far back in time. Professor Almaini said: “With the UDS we can study distant galaxies in large numbers, and observe how they evolved at different stages in the history of the Universe. We see most of the galaxies in our image as they were billions of years before the Earth was formed.” The UDS is the deepest...